The Entrepreneurs

In dealing with my father’s things, I’ve found that he has 2 left of value.  First is his power recliner, which can get its occupant to a standing position with the touch of a button.  The second is his electric scooter.  That item was particularly expensive and not hassle-free; when my dad broke his hip in October and spent nearly 2 months away from home, its batteries discharged.  Figuring out that was the issue, procuring new batteries and then recycling the old ones was one of those caregivers tasks that (a) doesn’t seem it should take a lot of time, but does, (b) doesn’t feel like caregiving but has to be done anyway and (c) is out of my comfort zone because I am not mechanically inclined.  I have a decent sense for when to sell Apple stock, but not that.

I originally had tried to sell these items.  It turns out to be harder that you would expect to sell working items in good condition to senior citizens.  Maybe this is because Medicare is the competition?  Anyway, I don’t really understand it.  So I had to shift my mindset and instead decided that I should give these away.  And once I decided on that, I hoped that I would find a good home.

I think I did.

The man who will be taking my father’s scooter and chair, the ones that brought him so much happiness, came to me via Jewish Family and Children’s Services.  I had listed these items for sale on my Temple’s email list, and that made its way to one of the geriatric care managers who had helped me before.  Karen is the one who guided me when my father was incontinent and too stubborn to admit it, which then meant he was about six inches from being evicted from his apartment community.   This was two years ago and I had wiped that unpleasant incident from my memory.  That’s a blessing in its own way.

His name is Eric (not actually, but let’s call him that).  Eric is much younger than my father and had a stroke about two years ago, which left him paralyzed on one side and with many physical and emotional challenges.  When people see him now, I’m sure this what they see.  It’s like when my father used to be admitted to the hospital and become elderly-male-who-fell-and-probably-has-dementia-and-so-many-other-problems; he was a whole person too and it took special caregivers to see it.

But Eric is a whole person.  His wife is amazing.  His family loves him.  And he is an entrepreneur like my father.  He started a business that he worked in for decades.  Even now he loves to get around his neighborhood despite the difficulties.  Once upon a time he enjoyed a cold beer on occasion.  My kind of guy.  He works tirelessly in PT and OT to regain and maintain whatever strengths and abilities he can.  He does not quit.  My father’s kind of guy.

So, I am happy that these items which gave my father so much joy and a perception of increased independence are making their way to a fellow entrepreneur.  He would have wanted another human being to have a chance to become more than the sum of his ailments.  My father had many flaws, heaven knows — but appreciating what this chair and the scooter did for him was not among them.  I suspect Eric, a fellow entrepreneur, is in the same boat.

 

 

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One response to “The Entrepreneurs”

  1. Natalie Landgreen says :

    Yet another beautiful and insightful post. Your most recent prose have brought me to tears – in part because of the topic, of course – but also because I have now become deep in the throws of caregiving. I will continue to read through your history of blogs for additional insight into what’s in store for me. Thank you.

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